Sunday, 20 March 2016

Prussian Special Reserve

Hinton Hunt PN 5: Prussian Line Infantry (separate musket)
Cokecan aluminium is surprisingly flexible!
I'm ashamed to admit that it's now over a year since Don sent me this and several other Prussian command figures as a gift. You can find my post about it here. I hope Don will forgive me for the inordinate length of time it's taken me to get round to him.

The figure, of course, is Hinton Hunt PN 5: Prussian Line Infantry (separate musket), one of three that Don very generously donated.

He's painted to represent the standard bearer of the 21st Infantry Regiment, formerly the 9th Reserve Infantry Regiment. When the Prussian reserve infantry regiments were raised in 1813, they were each provided with a small cadre of regular officers and NCOs to lead them. As a senior NCO, my standard bearer is thus correctly dressed in his regular line infantry uniform, which will not be the case for most of his comrades.

Hinton Hunt PN 5: Prussian Line Infantry (separate musket)
It also provides a beautifully smooth
painting surface
As no-one really knows what, if any, pattern of flag was carried by the reserve infantry battalions, I've given him what Nash considers to be one of the more common types of unofficial flag carried by at least some of the Prussian reserve and landwehr regiments. I've had another go at coke-can metal for this, with the edges blunted by a bit of filing and varnish.

Surprisingly, perhaps, this flag was much harder to do than the Garde du Corps guidon. It's very difficult to get anything like symmetrical cross when painting freehand. This particular example is my third attempt!

WM

EDIT: With special thanks to Steve C, who gave me the idea for coke-can flags in the first place and told me how to do them.

12 comments :

  1. This flag is most impressive, and the paint job axcellent...

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  2. Cheers Phil. A simple design, but eye-catching nonetheless!

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  3. Impressed by the flag ! , Tony

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    1. Cheers Tony. They don't come much more Prussiany than that!

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  4. More lovely work Matt. It reminds me of my attempts to make flag-bearers from the same figure when I was 12 - although I hasten to add yours is x1000 better than mine was!

    Only a year in the lead pile? Don will be asking me to reassign some of mine to you!!!

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    1. I know what you mean, Ian. He makes it feel like 1972 all over again (although I was only 6!).

      My disgraceful failure to use Don's men, what with being distracted with all those showy Frenchmen and Bavarians and what-have-you, is only matched only by the complete non-appaerance of the 2nd East Prussian Grenadiers. See my "Easter Prunny" post of last year!

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    2. Another brilliant figure Matt! Enviable brushwork.
      A suggestion with the metal flags, if I may: I assume that you start out with he flag flat, then attach it to the pole, then animate it, then paint. When you have the work piece flat draw the flag on to it with a very thin permanent fibre tip pen and then scribe the main shape, e.g. the cross with a pin or some such held in a pin chuck. The importance of scribing is that the paint will tend to stop on that line and thus maintain the shape, even when billowed out. I think that is how Hinton made the flags for the Brtsh and French standard gearers, though I suspect lead sheet was the medium for the master.

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    3. Roy, you are correct, that is exactly how I was doing them. Your method sounds infinitely superior. As with many of these things, which seem so obvious once they have been stated, now that you've said it I feel foolish for not having thought of it myself!

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  5. Yes! A striking and very well-executed flag. ANd what a fantastic idea to use Coke cans.

    Best Regards,

    Stokes

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    1. Thank you Stokes! Your blog is one of my main sources of inspiration. I'm not brave enough to paint them like you do, however!

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  6. Tis far better to bear the year of anticipation than a lifetime sequestered in a dark drawer of a cabinet consigned to the garage.

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    1. Thank you Don. Let's hope the 21st Regiment does him proud!

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