Sunday, 25 March 2018

First Class Fusiliers


I've got a bit more to show off than I expected this week. I think it must be the novelty of working with proper Hinton Hunts. I can actually see what I'm doing for a change.

First up is the command group, which features an absolutely cracking Hinton Hunt FN 241: French Infantry of the Line 1807-12, Officer charging. Next to him is a recast David Clayton FN 4a: French Colour Bearer without sword. Considering that he's effectively a recast of a Clayton copy of a Der Kriegspielers conversion of a Hinton Hunt, he's not come out too badly.


Behind them are nine newly completed vintage Hinton Hunt FN 244: French Infantry of the Line 1807-12, Fuslier charging. I think these are gorgeous figures, although having said that I've modified them slightly by turning their heads to the left. The originals were sort of vaguely staring off to the right rather than looking where they were going, no doubt as an aid to casting. Marcus obviously expected his customers to reposition the heads, or that's my story, anyway.


I've even managed to finish another general for them, but as he's yet to dry I'm saving him for next week. If nothing else he'll help to fill the gap while the next two companies are in production.

That's it for now,
WM

26 comments :

  1. Great job, fantastic details and colors!

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  2. That officer really is a lovely figure - great flag too!

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    1. No anchors, alas, but I managed to squeeze tiny little 67s onto it. The figure is a little slim, but he painted up quite nicely all the same.

      I think the FN 244 has taken my favourite figure spot.

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  3. Vive l'Empereur! At last some fresh froggies to rejuvenate the Ogre's megalomanac attempt to put all Europe under the Eagle... ...and very nice too, although clearly still living the heyday of Empire. They might be in for a surprise as the Prussian student becomes the master, but if their creator completes some of the Kaiserliks we've been teased with there may yet be time relive the Glory Days.
    I almost missed them as for some reason the Unfashionably Shiny web-site didn't show your blog as recently updated, luckily I checked,and yes I do refresh/reload frequently.

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    1. French line infantry are some of the most difficult figures to paint, which is probably why Napoleon is so desperately outnumbered. Perhaps the answer is more guardsmen!

      I've yet to figure out how to actually subscribe to Unfashionably Shiny, to my shame.

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    2. That's why I reckoned a great-coated battalion would be a good idea - be an ideal candidate for an all fusilier unit of Marie Louise's?

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    3. I've only got three figures in a greatcoat, Rob, so a battalion is out of reach at the moment. I may need to get the soldering iron out again.....

      There's aren't too many options for representing C-class levies for the French, unfortunately. I may eventually designate the DKs for this job, but as that would involve the entire army at this point I'll hold off for the time being.

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  4. These are lovely...

    I am looking forward to seeing the whole unit.

    All the best. Aly

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    1. I've got two lovely flank companies for them, Aly. One of these days I'll do an all-fusilier battalion, but I couldn't quite make up the numbers with this one.

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  5. Very fetching figures! The orange pompoms are especially eye-catching. Humbrol?

    Best Regards,


    Stokes

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    1. It is indeed, Stokes. H 82 Orange, I think, with a quick dry brush of yellow. I was going to paint them the traditional vintage sky blue again until I remembered there were other colours available.

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  6. The re-positioned head is I think an improvement on the original. Whilst the French take time to paint I find British fiddlier to do.

    Looking forward to seeing the completed unit.

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    1. The only Brit-like regiment I've done is the Bremen Battalion, Mark. This wasn't too hard, I thought, but then I was painting it with black belts.

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  7. The turned heads are an improvement. With the original head facing all looking to the right you have to place the officers as right markers so the chaps are watching for the command to charge.
    Hinton made a small dummy first which was in the at ease position,facing firward, so for this lad he just neglected to rurn the head . As to why he did not turn it, lijely he forgot, or quite possibly succumbed to tgat ennui that affects master makers where they hust cannot bear to do another figure in exactly tge same position.
    Euther way, lovely painting. Also, when you have a real original figure the detail, propirtions and pise are excellent.

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    1. You are absolutely right, LG. Original castings make all the difference. Having said that that, they were terribly flashy and their legs, muskets and arms were twisted about in all directions. I haven't entirely succeeded in correcting all of this, so they're going to have a slightly higgledy piggledy appearance at the finish.

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  8. Up there with the very best of your work I think, WM?

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    1. Cheers, Tony. Too early to say. The flank companies are made up of those infamous air guitarists. They look hideously difficult!

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  9. Impressively presented figures - a credit to any war games table!

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    1. That's very kind of you to say so, AP. It's always a pleasure to work with originals. They really were the Rolls Royce of the wargames world back in the earlies.

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  10. Lovely as always, but I am left with the burning question of how does one reposition a head. I have this horrid vision of lopers and knives and saws, but I am hoping the original lead is forgiving enough to allow a modest turn.

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    1. Very carefully, is the answer, lest one mash up one's beautiful vintage castings, which is exactly what I did with one of them. What I did after that was soak them in hot (but not boiling) water to make them just malleable enough to do it with my fingers. It was quite difficult to see exactly what I was doing by this method, so I haven't got them exactly aligned, but the castings remained undamaged, which is the main thing.

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  11. Fantastic work Matt once again. I found the same with Hinchliffe castings, a soak in very hot water and you can bend and twist them with ease. Not sure you could do it with 'modern' chunky castings?

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    1. It was an altogether nerve-wracking business, 'Lee. It was only after reading about it on your blog that I realised that hot water was the best way to do it, for which my infinite thanks.

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